KIDNEY HEART CROSSTALK DELEGATE PAGE

WELCOME

Welcome to the delegate page for the Kidney Heart Crosstalk. You will find all the important information here.

HOUSEKEEPING EXHIBITION AREA PROGRAMME SATURDAY 15 OCTOBER 2022 PROGRAMME SUNDAY 16 OCTOBER 2022

HOUSEKEEPING

Renal Association Desk
For any queries go to the Renal Association Desk in the exhibition area outside the conference hall.. Note the desk will not be open during lectures. You may also post your queries on the Crosstalk Whatsapp group to which you should have been added to.

Registration
On arrival, go to the Renal Association Desk to register. You can collect your delegate badge once you quote your full name and MCM number.

Receipts
Some delegates will have received their receipts prior to the start of the conference. Delegates who have not yet received their receipts should go to the Renal Association Desk.

Certificates of attendance
These will be availaible for collection at the third session of each day at the Renal Association Desk outside the conference hall.

CPD attendance sheets
Please note that there will be an attendance sheet to be signed for CPD points for each of the three sessions on each conference day. These will be circulated at the end of each session.

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EXHIBITION AREA

Please spend some time in the exhibition area where you will find the Renal Association Desk but also the stands of the many sponsors of the Renal Association. Sponsors play a vital role in this Crosstalk enable to keep costs for delegates down and allow us to bring distinguished local and international speakers to this event. The stands will also enable you to keep you updated with the latest developments in the pharmaceutical and medical industries. Find out more about our sponsors here.

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PROGRAMME SATURDAY 15 OCTOBER 2022

Opening speeches
TBA

Diabetes, Renal & Cardiovascular Disease: the malignant triad.
Professor John Deanfield, University College London, UK


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
John Deanfield CBE is Professor of Cardiology at University College London (UCL) and Director of National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) which incorporates the national databases for cardiovascular outcomes. Deanfield undertook his training at Churchill College, Cambridge, the Middlesex, Hammersmith and Great Ormond Street Hospitals, London. His principal interests are vascular medicine, opportunities for lifetime management of cardiovascular risk and large scale cardiovascular outcomes research. He has been at the forefront in describing the impact of obesity, cholesterol, diabetes, smoking and other risk factors on health in later life, through coordination of multiple large longitudinal cardiovascular studies in population throughout lifetime   He Chaired the Joint British Societies (JBS3) National Guidelines for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention (2014) and led the development of the public facing Heart Age Tool (2015). He was awarded the British Cardiac Society McKenzie Award, the John Hopkins All Children’s Hospital Decades of Service Award in 2017 and was made Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 2021. He Chaired the UK’s National Health Check Programme Review (2021) and is Chief Medical Advisor to the new national Our Future Health programme (2020). He is currently Chairing the development of the new JBS4 Consensus Guidelines. Professor Deanfield serves on many international advisory boards and is a member of the editorial boards of several major CV journals. He has published numerous articles in leading medical and scientific journals.

The kidney as a driver of cardiovascular disease.
Professor John Cunningham, University College London, UK



Abstract
The fact that advanced kidney disease is more dangerous than most cancers is not widely appreciated beyond the sphere of those who study and care for these patients. The risk of death faced by a young adult dialysis patient is 50-100 fold greater than that of a person of similar age without kidney disease, making dialysis far more dangerous than most cancers. The impact of kidney disease on survival exhibits a dose-response effect, with increasingly powerful negative effects seen as the level of kidney function falls. Most of the deaths are cardiac and the effect is seen regardless of the cause of the kidney disease, though may be amplified by some, for example diabetes. Successful transplantation dramatically reduces this hazard, though does not eliminate it. Diverse biomechanical and metabolic disturbances, increasingly florid as the level of kidney function falls, are the main drivers but drilling down reveals daunting complexity such that this remains “a work in progress”. Mitigation centres around prevention of the primary kidney disease (often not possible), slowing its progression, or substitution by transplantation (hindered by inadequate organ supply and loss of some grafts from rejection and other causes). Dialysis is both the least effective and the most expensive treatment option for ‘end stage’ kidney disease, being much inferior to transplantation which provides a rare example of “cheap is best’ in the healthcare setting.

Prof

Speaker Details
John Cunningham is a clinician-scientist holding positions as Professor of Nephrology at University College London Medical School and The Royal Free Hospital and an Honorary Fellowship at Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge. He is a graduate of the universities of Cambridge and Oxford followed by postgraduate training in London and Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, under Drs Louis V Avioli and Eduardo Slatopolsky. He is an active clinician and researcher with contributions to the understanding of the effect of acidosis on the bioactivation of vitamin D, the influence of simulated uraemia and vitamin D on the release of cytokines by bone cells, factors mediating bone loss following renal transplantation and the control of parathyroid function by structurally modified vitamin D metabolites and calcimimetics. He has also focussed increasingly on the links between mineral metabolism and cardiovascular disease in CKD and the reasons for the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is these individuals. He serves on various grant giving bodies, guideline groups and charities, lectures nationally and internationally and is co-chairman of the ‘Cardiology, Diabetes and Nephrology At The Limits’ series held under the auspices of University College London, The University of Cape Town, The Brigham and Women’s Hospital and The Lancet.

Refining anti-platelet therapy in acute coronary syndromes
Professor Mohamed H Jeilan, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
Not available

Renovascular disease management in 2022
Professor Phil Kalra, University of Manchester, UK


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
Professor Philip Kalra, Professor of Nephrology at the University of Manchester, graduated from Cambridge University and St Thomas’s Hospital Medical School and has been a consultant at Salford since 1995. He is Director of Research and Innovation in the Northern Care Alliance, the trust encompassing Salford Royal where he has been consultant nephrologist since 1995. He was Academic Vice President of the UK Renal Association 2016-19, Chair of the UK Kidney Research Consortium during this time and was Chair of the NIHR CRN Renal Disorders group from 2010 until 2018. He is the lead of the Donal O’Donoghue Renal Research Centre, the local research centre named in honour of his late great colleague and friend, and he has been involved in the development of several large UK clinical trials in nephrology and cardiology, including the ASTRAL, PIVOTAL and IRONMAN trials and the NURTuRE cohort. He has a long history of involvement in preparing candidates for the MRCP UK, and has played a role in improving collaboration between Nephrology and Cardiology in both scientific and educational endeavours.

Overcoming diuretic resistance in cardio-renal patients
Dr Nilesh Mohabeer, AG Jeetoo Hospital, Mauritius


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
Not available

Contrast nephropathy: myths and facts
Dr Ougrashan Bheekharry, Victoria Hospital, Mauritius


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
Not available

Management of type 2 diabetes- out with the old, in with the new!
Professor Stephanie Baldeweg, University College London Hospital, UK


Abstract
A patient-centred approach should be used to guide the choice of pharmacologic agents in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Considerations include cardiovascular comorbid conditions, hypoglycemia risk, impact on weight, cost, risk for side effects, and patient preferences. Current guidelines of managing type 2 diabetes recommend metformin and comprehensive lifestyle modification as first line treatment. Additional agents, including GLP-1 receptor agonists and SGLT2 inhibitors are currently second line Metformin is the preferred initial pharmacologic agent. Early combination therapy can be considered in some patients at treatment initiation to extend the time to treatment failure. The early introduction of insulin should be considered if there is evidence of ongoing catabolism (weight loss), if symptoms of hyperglycemia are present, or when hemoglobin A 1c  (HbA 1c ) or blood glucose levels are very high (HbA 1c >10% ,blood glucose ≥16.7 mmol/L). In patients with type 2 diabetes with established ASCVD or indicators of high risk, established kidney disease, or heart failure, a SGLT2 inhibitor or GLP-1 RA with demonstrated cardiovascular disease benefit is recommended. In patients with type 2 diabetes who need greater glucose lowering than can be obtained with oral agents, GLP-1 RAs are preferred to insulin when possible. The medication regimen and medication-taking behaviour should be reevaluated at regular intervals (every 3 to 6 months) and adjusted as needed to incorporate specific factors that affect choice of treatment.

Speaker details
Professor Stephanie Baldeweg works as a Consultant Physician in Diabetes and Endocrinology at University College London Hospital and as Honorary Professor at UCL. She is Clinical Lead of the Department of Diabetes & Endocrinology at UCLH. She graduated from Humboldt University Berlin in 1990 and received her MD on Endothelial function and insulin resistance in 2002 in London. In 2009 she was elected Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland and of the Royal College of Physicians in London (FRCP). She has held a number of National Roles including Associate Academic Dean, Health Education England and Associate Director for Higher Specialties Training, UCL Partners. She is chair of the Clinical Committee, UK Society for Endocrinology and chair of the Joint Specialty Committee for Endocrinology and Diabetes at the Royal College of Physicians. Professor Baldeweg is interested in all aspects of diabetes and endocrinology, weight management and cardiovascular risk reduction. Her main academic interest aims to improve patient care through systematic clinical research with a focus on cross-specialty working and comorbidities. Her research expertise spans from fundamental basic science through to clinical trials, real word studies and influencing policy/guidelines. Professor Baldeweg has published extensively in high impact journals and textbooks. During Covid-19 pandemic Professor Baldeweg led the Society for Endocrinology response across the UK on managing diabetes and endocrine conditions in patients with Covid-19 infections as well as those affected by reduced access to healthcare during the pandemic. This was endorsed and distributed by many other professional societies and patient groups. Prof Baldeweg is a keen medical educator, having received the UCLH Chairman’s medal for excellence in clinical education and regularly lectures at national and international meetings as well as Patient days for UK charities

The role of SGLT2 inhibitors in HFrEF
Dr M A Abdool, Trust Fund for Specialised Medical Care, Pamplemousses, Mauritius


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
I am an interventional cardiologist currently working at The Trust Fund for Specialised Medical Care in Pamplemousses. I currently undertake interventional procedures and train my colleagues in advanced/complex techniques such as tackling difficult, tortuous, calcified and chronically occluded arteries. These new and advanced methods allow me to treat and stent previously untreatable patients and also gives an alternative to Bypass/Open Heart Surgery. I also implant pacemakers using the latest techniques. After being awarded a national scholarship (1st Laureate College du St Esprit – 2001 batch), I went on to complete my undergraduate medical education at the University of Manchester and my general medical training in the North West Deanery before proceeding to interventional cardiology and General Internal Medical training in the same region. I have presented numerous posters at international and European conferences. I am heavily involved in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education and I have completed a Post Graduate Diploma in Medical Education from the University of Manchester. I have also gained recognition as a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in the UK for my role as a postgraduate trainer and lecturer. I have also published PubMed listed papers in the field of cardiology and medical education. I have now returned to my country under the national diaspora scheme to share my expertise and help improve cardiac services for my fellow citizens.

Pharmacogenomics of hypertension: past, present and future
Professor Brian Rayner, University of Cape Town, SA


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
Not available

BUFFET DINNER


STARTERS
Mixed Salads
Crudités: lettuce, tomato, watercress, cabbage, cucumber
Shrimp salad sweet chili sauce
Cucumber, olive and coriander
German potato salad
Eggplant caviar with crispy bread fruit chips
Tofu pineapple salad
Broccoli and green apple salad
Fish vindaye
Greek salad
Verrines
Melon gazpacho with fresh basil
Smoked Merlin tartare with pineapple salsa
Assorted hummus: beetroot,plain
Tomato basket of garlic crouton

MAIN COURSE
Lamb roghan josh
Filet of dorado with grilled, tomato salsa
Butter chicken
Calamari black bean
Sautéed spaghetti & seafood bisque
Pumpkin gratin with truffle oil
Butter garlic steam vegetables
Farata & condiments

DESSERT
Lemon grass crème brulée
Puit d’amour
Banana tart
Red velvet cake
Cheese cake
Creme caramel
Apricot poach tart
Biackberry chocolate mousse
Fruit cuts
Ice cream

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PROGRAMME SUNDAY 16 OCTOBER 2022

Not all cardiomyopathies are ischaemic
Dr Mohammad Timol, Wellkin Hospital, Mauritius


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
Not available

Cancer survivors: can we avoid late cardiovascular & renal complications.
Professor Malcolm Walker, University College London, UK


Abstract not available

Speaker details
Qualified in Medicine from the University of Birmingham, with clinical training in cardiology at St Thomas’ Hospital London and Oxford. Appointed as Consultant Cardiologist and Physician at University College Hospital London (UCLH) in 1987 and Professor of Cardiology in 2019. In 1990 co-founded the Hatter Cardiovascular Institute (HCI) with Prof Derek Yellon. The HCI has an international reputation in laboratory and translational research, focusing on myocardial protection and producing >800 publications and over 70 MD and PhDs. In 1990, in response to perceived clinical need a dedicated cardiology clinic for patients with disorders of haemoglobin, such as thalassaemia (TM) and sickle cell disease, was established at UCLH. The MRI T2* for non-invasive tissue iron measurement was developed in collaboration with Prof Dudley Pennell. Clinical use of T2* has been credited with a >70% reduction in mortality in Thalassaemia and has been adopted world-wide. In recent years research has focused on the application of novel, abbreviated cardiac MRI sequences (rCMR), with trials of rCMR protocols completed in Thailand, India, and Peru. In 2016 Prof Walker initiated the Cardio-oncology clinical service at UCLH. This is an expanding clinical service serving cancer patients with cardiovascular complications and now deals with >700 out-patient consultations per annum, in addition to acute in-patient support. Cardio-oncology has been linked to a growing research effort established within the HCI. Prof Walker whilst primarily a clinician, has published over 120 articles & has a Scopus H-index of~40.

Cardioprotection in the setting of ischaemia-reperfusion during STEMI
Professor Derek Yellon, University College London, UK


Abstract
Despite evidence of myocardial infarct size reduction in both preclinical and small “proof of concept” clinical studies, the phenomenon of Remote Ischaemic Conditioning (RIC) has failed to improve clinical outcomes in the recent large CONDI-2/ERIC-PPCI outcome trial. We believe the main reason for this is the predominantly low-risk study participants who all received timely optimal reperfusion therapy by means of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). Whether RIC can improve clinical outcomes in higher-risk STEMI patients in environments with poor access to early reperfusion or indeed PPCI, is being investigated in the RIC-AFRICA trial. This study is a sub-Saharan African multi-centre, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled clinical trial designed to test the impact of RIC on the composite endpoint of 30-day mortality and heart failure in 1200 adult STEMI patients, without access to PPCI, and receiving reperfusion therapy via thrombolysis. Participants will receive either RIC (four 5-minute cycles of inflation [20mmHg above systolic blood pressure] and deflation of an automated blood- pressure cuff placed on the upper arm) or sham-control (similar protocol but with low-pressure inflation of 20mmHg and deflation) within 1 hour of thrombolysis and applied daily for the next 2 days. It is hoped that the RIC-AFRICA trial will determine whether this intervention can reduce rates of death and heart failure in higher-risk, sub-optimally reperfused STEMI patients, thereby providing a low-cost, non-invasive therapy for improving health outcomes.

Speaker Details
Derek M Yellon PhD, DSc (UK), DSc (UCT), FRCP, FACC, FESC, FBCS, FAHA, is Professor of Molecular & Cellular Cardiology at University College London (UCL) & Director of the Hatter Cardiovascular Institute at UCL and University College London Hospital (UCLH). Professor Yellon has held a number of National & International roles including Vice-President of the British Cardiovascular Society; Chairman of the Cellular Biology Working Group of the European Society of Cardiology; Member of the World Council of the International Society for Heart Research, Programme Director (Cardiology & Diabetes) for the NIHR-UCLH Biomedical Research Centre and a Senior Investigator and member of the College of Senior Investigators. In 1994, he was awarded a DSc from the University of Bath (UK) for his “substantial contribution to the knowledge of cardiovascular disease and treatment” and in 2013 he was been awarded a second Doctor of Science (honorius causa) degree from the University of Cape Town, in recognition of “his distinguished basic and clinical research in the mechanisms underlying myocardial protection”. Due to his significant involvement with the Medical School at the University of Cape Town (UCT) he was, in 1997, made an Honorary Professor in the Department of Medicine at UCT. He also holds Honorary Professorships at the University of South Alabama in the USA, and the North China Coal Medical University in China. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians; the American College of Cardiology; the European Society of Cardiology; the International Society for Heart Research, The British Cardiovascular Society, and the American Heart Association. He sits on the editorial board of several major Cardiovascular Journals and has himself published in excess of 600 papers and edited 23 books. He has an H factor of 113 (Web of Science). Prof Yellon runs a translational research Institute at UCL/UCLH with his main area of interest including myocardial, neuro and renal protection, and the pathophysiology of cellular protection in the setting of diabetes, ischaemia/reperfusion injury, molecular aspects of adaptation to ischaemic injury and ischaemic conditioning in both the basic and clinical arena.

The right place for metformin in kidney patients
Dr Mehjabeen Beebeejaun. The Curis Clinic, Mauritius


Abstract
Metformin remains the cornerstone in the management of Type2 diabetes due to its efficacy , accessibility and cost effectiveness. However, the use of metformin in advanced kidney disease remain controversial due to the fear of developing lactic acidosis. Metformin has been shown to reduce the all cause mortality and progression to ESKD in patients with advanced diabetic kidney disease. Suprisingly, more and more studies have shown that metformin may not increase the risk of lactic and metabolic acidosis and the drug is quite safe for patients with CKD stage 3B  I would be reviewing the literature for and against the use of metformin in this subgroup of patients.

Speaker details
Dr Mehjabeen Beebeejaun is a Consultant Physician, Diabetologist and Endocrinologist who completed her undergraduate training from the University of Cape Town in 2004 and completed her specialist training at St George’s and King’s College in London. She currently practices privately in Mauritius, she is the founder of the Curis clinic. She is also the Vice President of EDA Mauritius

Diagnosing glomerular disease in Mauritius
Dr Davy Ip Min Wan, SSRN Hospital, Mauritius


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
Not available

CKD-MBD management: Keeping an eye on the heart
Professor John Cunningham, University College London, UK


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
John Cunningham is a clinician-scientist holding positions as Professor of Nephrology at University College London Medical School and The Royal Free Hospital and an Honorary Fellowship at Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge. He is a graduate of the universities of Cambridge and Oxford followed by postgraduate training in London and Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, under Drs Louis V Avioli and Eduardo Slatopolsky. He is an active clinician and researcher with contributions to the understanding of the effect of acidosis on the bioactivation of vitamin D, the influence of simulated uraemia and vitamin D on the release of cytokines by bone cells, factors mediating bone loss following renal transplantation and the control of parathyroid function by structurally modified vitamin D metabolites and calcimimetics. He has also focussed increasingly on the links between mineral metabolism and cardiovascular disease in CKD and the reasons for the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is these individuals. He serves on various grant giving bodies, guideline groups and charities, lectures nationally and internationally and is co-chairman of the ‘Cardiology, Diabetes and Nephrology At The Limits’ series held under the auspices of University College London, The University of Cape Town, The Brigham and Women’s Hospital and The Lancet.

Primary PCI. Where we are right now?
Dr Oomesh Shamloll, Dr AG Jeetoo Hospital, Mauritius


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
Not available

Quest for stalling progression of CKD: probiotics
Dr A V Ingale, Fortis Hospital, Mulund, Mumbai


Abstract
Not available

Speaker details
Not available

CONCLUDING DEBATE: Would you entrust your heart to a nephrologist or your kidneys to a cardiologist?
Professor Phil Kalra (Nephrologist), University of Manchester, UK vs Professor Paul Kalra (Cardiologist), University of Portsmouth, UK


Abstract
The treatment for many patients has become increasingly complex and many healthcare professionals more and more specialised. There is a real danger that when a patient is seen by a healthcare professional, management focuses on a particular organ system as opposed to a more holistic, patient-centred approach. This is no more apparent than when considering patients with co-existent chronic kidney and cardiovascular disease. Non-specialists, patients and carers may receive mixed messages. Co- ordinated cross specialty working is required, to achieve best outcomes for patients. This debate will highlight some of the challenges encountered in clinical practice, with a focus on patients presenting with heart failure, and discuss strategies of how we might improve care provision.

Speakers details
Professor Philip Kalra, Professor of Nephrology at the University of Manchester, graduated from Cambridge University and St Thomas’s Hospital Medical School and has been a consultant at Salford since 1995. He is Director of Research and Innovation in the Northern Care Alliance, the trust encompassing Salford Royal where he has been consultant nephrologist since 1995. He was Academic Vice President of the UK Renal Association 2016-19, Chair of the UK Kidney Research Consortium during this time and was Chair of the NIHR CRN Renal Disorders group from 2010 until 2018. He is the lead of the Donal O’Donoghue Renal Research Centre, the local research centre named in honour of his late great colleague and friend, and he has been involved in the development of several large UK clinical trials in nephrology and cardiology, including the ASTRAL, PIVOTAL and IRONMAN trials and the NURTuRE cohort. He has a long history of involvement in preparing candidates for the MRCP UK, and has played a role in improving collaboration between Nephrology and Cardiology in both scientific and educational endeavours.

Prof Paul Kalra is a Consultant Cardiologist with specialist interest in heart failure at Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust, UK. Paul served on the British Society for Heart Failure Board from 2009 until 2019 (Chair 2017-2019). During his role as Chair he was instrumental in getting heart failure recognised as a national priority and incorporated into the NHS Long Term Plan. He is currently helping to drive implementation of the plan, contributing to NHS England’s ‘NHS Long Term Plan Heart Failure and Heart Valve Disease Expert Advisory Group’. He co-founded the UK Cardiorenal Forum, which will hold its 17 th  annual meeting in 2022. He has been involved in question writing and exam setting for the European Exam in General Cardiology for over 5 years and in 2020 was appointed Chair of the UK standard setting group for this exam.  He has set up and leads a cardiovascular research programme in Portsmouth. He is chief investigator for the British Heart Foundation funded IRONMAN study (outcome study of intravenous iron in patients with chronic heart failure), which is due to report in late 2022.

LUNCH BUFFET

Starters
Tandoori chicken salad with mint chutney
Tofu salad with with marinated pineapple bean sprouts
Fish carpaccio, shallots, sweet melon, grissini nature
German potato salad with mustard and peppers
Assorted salad bar, dressing & condiments, pickles
Assorted bread rolls

Main Course
Steamed basmati rice
Sautéed tagliatelle with basil and tomato
Lamb navarin, glazed vegetables
Pan seared tuna in a bruised julienne vegetables -lemon butter sauce
BBQ chicken leg, caramelised onions
Paneer makhani cooked in spicy tomato and cream
Alloo matar
Chunky vegetable ratatouille

Dessert
Chocolate opera
Vanilla crème brulée
Apricot and blueberry tart
Indian sweet (ladoo/barfi)
Fresh fruit salad & ice cream

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